August 24, 2014
s-c-i-guy:

Bill Nye Fights Back
How a mild-mannered children’s celebrity plans to save science in America—or go down swinging.
Read the full article on Popular Science

s-c-i-guy:

Bill Nye Fights Back

How a mild-mannered children’s celebrity plans to save science in America—or go down swinging.

Read the full article on Popular Science

(via colliderblog)

August 23, 2014
fromquarkstoquasars:

Curiosity Rover: Looking Back on the Two Years of Wear and Tear Inflicted By Mars
It’s insanely hard to believe that Curiosity has been traversing Mars for a full two years now, but, as these images show, time has certainly taken a toll on it. See before and after images of the damage: http://bit.ly/1pP0GpQ
Image Credit: NASA/JPL

fromquarkstoquasars:

Curiosity Rover: Looking Back on the Two Years of Wear and Tear Inflicted By Mars

It’s insanely hard to believe that Curiosity has been traversing Mars for a full two years now, but, as these images show, time has certainly taken a toll on it. See before and after images of the damage: http://bit.ly/1pP0GpQ

Image Credit: NASA/JPL

(via art-sci)

August 23, 2014
sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

image

(via hughdiancie)

August 15, 2014

mymodernmet:

Japanese illustrator and designer Akihiro Mizuuchi used precise molds to make LEGOs out of chocolate, opening up a whole realm of possibilities for building and snacking.

August 15, 2014

kqedscience:

Meet the First Woman to Win Math’s Most Prestigious Prize

As an 8-year-old, Maryam Mirzakhani used to tell herself stories about the exploits of a remarkable girl. Every night at bedtime, her heroine would become mayor, travel the world or fulfill some other grand destiny.

Today, Mirzakhani — a 37-year-old mathematics professor at Stanford University — still writes elaborate stories in her mind. The high ambitions haven’t changed, but the protagonists have: They are hyperbolic surfaces, moduli spaces and dynamical systems. In a way, she said, mathematics research feels like writing a novel. “There are different characters, and you are getting to know them better,” she said. “Things evolve, and then you look back at a character, and it’s completely different from your first impression.”

Learn more about Maryam Mirzakhani at wired.

(via shychemist)

August 11, 2014

curiosamathematica:

Have you ever noticed the refraction of light in a cup of coffee?

The envelope of light rays reflected or refracted by a curved surface is called a caustic (from the Latin causticus, “burning”); more concrete a catacaustic in case of reflection, and a diacaustic in case of refraction. The caustic is a curve or surface to which each of the light rays is tangent. In case of a circle, the resulting shape is a cardioid.

Wolfram MathWorld provides a list of famous catacaustics.
Rainbows are familiar examples of caustics as well!

(via subatomiconsciousness)

August 10, 2014

fightingforanimals:

Hero the calf gets his legs back - and inspires children the world over with disabilities.

When former veterinary technician and retired truck driver Kitty Martin first met Hero the calf on a Virginia farm last spring, his hind legs were so damaged by frostbite that he had to have them both amputated. But if he were to survive after being rescued and taken to his new home with Martin in Texas, he would need some form of mobility.

The new legs are made from hard-wearing titanium with urethane hooves, with connecting components made out of titanium and carbon fibre, and sockets made of carbon fibre and acrylic resin. They are also adjustable in both width and height, so Hero can continue to wear them for some time to come — hopefully until they wear out.

Martin, meanwhile, hopes Hero will have a bright future as a therapy animal for wounded veterans and children with disabilities.

"There’s nothing he can’t do," she said. "He’s already doing things they said he’d never be able to do."

He lives at Selah Range All Animal Rescue, where he will be safe and loved forever. He has two documentaries and is even bringing out a book to inspire children with disabilities <3

(via elisetheviking)

August 8, 2014

myampgoesto11:

X-Ray GIFs by Cameron Drake | Behance 

My Amp Goes To 11Twitter | Instagram

(via ohscience)

August 8, 2014
neurosciencestuff:

New prosthetic arm controlled by neural messages 
This design hopes to identify the memory of movement in the amputee’s brain to translate to an order allowing manipulation of the device.
Controlling a prosthetic arm by just imagining a motion may be possible through the work of Mexican scientists at the Centre for Research and Advanced Studies (CINVESTAV), who work in the development of an arm replacement to identify movement patterns from brain signals.
First, it is necessary to know if there is a memory pattern to remember in the amputee’s brain in order to know how it moved and, thus, translating it to instructions for the prosthesis,” says Roberto Muñoz Guerrero, researcher at the Department of Electrical Engineering and project leader at Cinvestav.
He explains that the electric signal won’t come from the muscles that form the stump, but from the movement patterns of the brain. “If this phase is successful, the patient would be able to move the prosthesis by imagining different movements.”
However, Muñoz Guerrero acknowledges this is not an easy task because the brain registers a wide range of activities that occur in the human body and from all of them, the movement pattern is tried to be drawn. “Therefore, the first step is to recall the patterns in the EEG and define there the memory that can be electrically recorded. Then we need to evaluate how sensitive the signal is to other external shocks, such as light or blinking.”
Regarding this, it should be noted that the prosthesis could only be used by individuals who once had their entire arm and was amputated because some accident or illness. Patients were able to move the arm naturally and stored in their memory the process that would apply for the use of the prosthesis.
According to the researcher, the prosthesis must be provided with a mechanical and electronic system, the elements necessary to activate it and a section that would interpret the brain signals. “Regarding the material with which it must be built, it has not yet been fully defined because it must weigh between two and three kilograms, which is similar to the missing arm’s weight.”
The unique prosthesis represents a new topic in bioelectronics called BCI (Brain Computer Interface), which is a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device in order to help or repair sensory and motor functions. “An additional benefit is the ability to create motion paths for the prosthesis, which is not possible with commercial products,” says Muñoz Guerrero.

neurosciencestuff:

New prosthetic arm controlled by neural messages

This design hopes to identify the memory of movement in the amputee’s brain to translate to an order allowing manipulation of the device.

Controlling a prosthetic arm by just imagining a motion may be possible through the work of Mexican scientists at the Centre for Research and Advanced Studies (CINVESTAV), who work in the development of an arm replacement to identify movement patterns from brain signals.

First, it is necessary to know if there is a memory pattern to remember in the amputee’s brain in order to know how it moved and, thus, translating it to instructions for the prosthesis,” says Roberto Muñoz Guerrero, researcher at the Department of Electrical Engineering and project leader at Cinvestav.

He explains that the electric signal won’t come from the muscles that form the stump, but from the movement patterns of the brain. “If this phase is successful, the patient would be able to move the prosthesis by imagining different movements.”

However, Muñoz Guerrero acknowledges this is not an easy task because the brain registers a wide range of activities that occur in the human body and from all of them, the movement pattern is tried to be drawn. “Therefore, the first step is to recall the patterns in the EEG and define there the memory that can be electrically recorded. Then we need to evaluate how sensitive the signal is to other external shocks, such as light or blinking.”

Regarding this, it should be noted that the prosthesis could only be used by individuals who once had their entire arm and was amputated because some accident or illness. Patients were able to move the arm naturally and stored in their memory the process that would apply for the use of the prosthesis.

According to the researcher, the prosthesis must be provided with a mechanical and electronic system, the elements necessary to activate it and a section that would interpret the brain signals. “Regarding the material with which it must be built, it has not yet been fully defined because it must weigh between two and three kilograms, which is similar to the missing arm’s weight.”

The unique prosthesis represents a new topic in bioelectronics called BCI (Brain Computer Interface), which is a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device in order to help or repair sensory and motor functions. “An additional benefit is the ability to create motion paths for the prosthesis, which is not possible with commercial products,” says Muñoz Guerrero.

(via we-are-star-stuff)

August 8, 2014

ucresearch:

How to float a ping pong ball in mid-air

Dianna “Physics Girl” Cowern, physicist at UC San Diego’s Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, explains in this video how The Coandă Effect can make a ping pong ball float in mid-air.

Read more about Diana Cowern and her quest to encourage girls to pursue science.