September 25, 2014
human-body-anatomy:

Great video on Head and Neck anatomy

human-body-anatomy:

Great video on Head and Neck anatomy

(via theolduvaigorge)

September 22, 2014

(Source: ashoutintothevoid, via art-sci)

September 19, 2014
nevver:

Science!

nevver:

Science!

(via shychemist)

September 19, 2014

myvoicemyright:

Breaking down barriers: Russian designers present catwalk collections on disabled models at Moscow Fashion Week

(via elisetheviking)

September 19, 2014

thelifeofapremed:

MCAT Physics Review! 

(via likeaphysicist)

September 19, 2014
themagnificentunknown:


science-and-things:

hlaar:

So I’ve heard somebody wanted to see a gif of that moment when Brian Cox was ran over by Stephen Hawking. Here it is, I hope it loads.

This gif changed my life

what have i just seen???

themagnificentunknown:

science-and-things:

hlaar:

So I’ve heard somebody wanted to see a gif of that moment when Brian Cox was ran over by Stephen Hawking. Here it is, I hope it loads.

This gif changed my life

what have i just seen???

(via art-sci)

September 12, 2014

pennyfornasa:

npr:

pbsthisdayinhistory:

Sept. 12, 1992: Dr. Mae Jemison Becomes First African American Woman in Space

On this day in 1992, Dr. Mae Jemison became the first African American woman to travel through space. She served as Mission Specialist aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-47.

WTCI’s Alison Lebovitz discusses the legacy of the first woman of color to travel beyond the stratosphere on “The A List with Alison Lebovitz.” Watch the interview here.

Photos: NASA

Jemison appeared on Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me in 2013 and told host Peter Sagal how she geeked out about Star Trek as a young woman, relished dancing in the Space Shuttle Endeavour, abhorred using diapers in space, and much more.

She also described what it felt like to finally achieve her dream of visiting space:

And I remember one time actually we flew through the Southern Lights… They’re these shimmering curtain of lights. So there’s nothing that you could have ever seen in a science fiction movie that would even come close to seeing that in person.

Pretty stellar.

-Kate

via sagansense

August 29, 2014

sagansense:

On August 23, 2014 in Salt Lake City, UT, ATK Aerospace Group presented our film 'I want to be an ASTRONAUT' to a sold out crowd of 280+ at the Clark Planetarium on a 70-foot IMAX screen.

imageSalt Lake City’s Sterling Poulson - Chief Meteorologist for KUTV 2News (with a plethora of credentials and a defense background) - served as the moderator for the evening. After a warm welcome to the crowd from Seth Jarvis - Director, Clark Planetarium - David Ruck - director of the film, which was originally his final thesis project upon achieving his MFA from American University - introduced the film and thanked @ClarkPlanet and @ATK for their tremendous support and collaboration toward this event.

Sterling Poulson then introduced the film in no better way than by initiating a countdown sequence, as per NASA space shuttle launches throughout history. At countdown #6, former NASA astronaut Jake Garn - Republican politician and former U.S. Senator for Utah who happens to be the first sitting member of the U.S. Congress to fly in space aboard space shuttle Discovery as a Payload Specialist (more here) and whom was in attendance among the crowd - stood up, put his hands in the air, and said “main engines start!” The countdown continued until the dramatic “launch” of the film.

What a night. Upon the end of the film, Sterling Poulson once again took to the mic and brought out David Ruck, Jake Garn, and fellow (former) NASA astronauts Charlie Precourt (Vice President of ATK) and Kent Rominger (Vice President of ATK’s Advanced Programs and former NASA Chief of the Astronaut Office at NASA JSC) all of whom engaged with the audience for a panel discussion about NASA, the past and developing present/future of space exploration, along with inspiring stories of dedication and commitment to their dreams.

There were children scattered amongst the attendees who donned mock astronaut uniforms, flight suits, and helmets. It was such a beautiful sight. Children and adults alike participated in a live Q&A with David and the astronauts.

As a personal aside, I spent a good portion of my time that evening speaking with Jake Garn and his wife before the screening (in the second to last photo from left to right: Jake, myself, and Melissa); and it’s only reaffirmed in me the assertion that regardless of whatever religious conviction one may have, the primary individuals who should experience spaceflight and acquire "the overview effect" must be politicians. Although I certainly support efficient access to space for all human beings on Earth - serving as our first steps to becoming a global spacefaring civilization - if we are to continue forth along this political trajectory of “business as usual”, it’s necessary for those appointed or interested in running to venture beyond our atmosphere, witness the Earth from space, and grasp the role of stewardship we have to each other, the rich biodiversity of this planet, and to the cosmos itself.

I encourage you all to watch this brief but intimate message from General Garn. Even though Mr. Garn’s opinon of extraterrestrial life in the universe may be slightly anthropocentric, it’s indeed refreshing to hear such an inspiring perspective from an acclaimed Republican Mormon who flew aboard Space Shuttle Discovery…the very same spacecraft I witnessed become retired and stowed away as an artifact in the Udvar-Hazy Air & Space Museum.

#astronautsBRO

website || trailer || clip || audience reactions || interview || charlie bolden

August 29, 2014
amazingphysics:

 

amazingphysics:

 

(Source: foxadhd.com, via space-tart)

August 29, 2014
npr:

Ebola has a nasty reputation for damaging the body, especially its blood vessels. But when you look at the nitty-gritty details of what happens after a person is infected, a surprising fact surfaces.
How Ebola Kills You: It’s Not The Virus
Illustration credit: Lisa Brown for NPR

npr:

Ebola has a nasty reputation for damaging the body, especially its blood vessels. But when you look at the nitty-gritty details of what happens after a person is infected, a surprising fact surfaces.

How Ebola Kills You: It’s Not The Virus

Illustration credit: Lisa Brown for NPR

(via nursingisinmyblood)